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What is IELTS?

IELTS (International English Language Testing system) is designed to assess the language ability of candidates who want to study or work where English is the language of communication. The objective of IELTS coaching test is to help the universities and employers evaluate the language skills (English) of the applicants.

IELTS is recognized by over 6,000 organizations worldwide, including universities, employers, professional bodies, immigration authorities and other government agencies. IELTS coaching is widely recognized as a reliable means of assessing whether candidates are ready to study or train in the medium of English. IELTS coaching is owned by three partners, the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate, the British Council and IDP Education Australia (through its subsidiary company IELTS Australia Pvt. Ltd.).

When and where can I take the IELTS test?

IELTS is offered up to four times a month in more than 125 countries. Tests are usually on Saturdays or Thursdays. To find out test dates in your area, please contact your nearest IELTS coaching test center. A simple google search will help you find the center closest to you.
IELTS Academic vs IELTS General

There are two formats of the IELTS Test

  • Academic
  • General

Academic

For candidates taking the test for entry to undergraduate or postgraduate studies or for professional reasons

General

For candidates taking the test for entry to vocational or training programs not at degree level. For admission to secondary schools and for immigration purposes.
 
IELTS Academic Module

Those candidates who seek to study in foreign educational institutes must take the Academic Test. This test comprises four modules: Reading Module, Writing Module, Listening Module and Speaking Module.

Each Module carries a band score of 0-9. Different educational institutes in the same country require different band scores to give admissions to students. We train you to secure at least 7.5 bands so that you may get admission in a reputed university.

Preparing to take IELTS Coaching

  • Register as soon as possible
  • It’s important to familiarize yourself with the format of the test.
  • Take coaching at PACE™ to maximize your test result
  • Lot of practice is very important

 IELTS Results format

There is no pass or fail in IELTS Candidates are graded on their performance in the test, using scores from 1 to 9 for each part of the test i.e .Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. Your results from the four parts then produce an overall band score. The higher the band score, the better the result.

This unique 9 band system measures scores in a consistent manner wherever and whenever the test is taken. It is internationally recognized and understood, giving you a reliable international currency of evaluation.

When will I receive my results?

  • You will receive a Test Report Form which reports a score for each of the four skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking), as well as an overall band score. Half band scores may be awarded to indicate a strong performance within a particular band.
  • Results are issued 13 days after the test. At some test centers candidates may collect their results on the 13th day; at others, results are mailed on the 13th day.
  • You will receive only one copy of the Test Report Form. It’s important that you keep it safe as replacement Test Report Forms cannot be issued. Test centers will send copies of the Test Report Form to up to five recognizing organizations free of charge.

IELTS Test components & PACE™ guidance on preparation

IELTS consists of four modules (Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing). All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking modules. There is a choice of Reading and Writing modules according to whether a candidate is taking the Academic or General Training version of the test.

Click on the links below to learn more about each module. At PACE™ we have the best IELTS coaching & training methodology and a track record of producing the best results.

Listening

Timing: Approximately 30 minutes (plus 10 minutes’ transfer time)

Questions: There are 40 questions

A variety of question types is used, chosen from the following: multiple choice, matching, plan/map/diagram labelling, form completion, note completion, table completion, flowchart completion, summary completion, sentence completion, short-answer questions

Test Parts: There are 4 sections

Section 1 is a conversation between two people set in an everyday social context (e.g. a conversation in an accommodation agency) Section 2 is a monologue set in an everyday social context (e.g. a speech about local facilities or a talk about the arrangements for meals during a conference) Section 3 is a conversation between up to four people set in an educational or training context (e.g. a university tutor and a student discussing an assignment, or a group of students planning a research project) Section 4 is a monologue on an academic subject (e.g. a university lecture) Each section is heard once only A variety of voices and native-speaker accents is used

Skills assessed: A wide range of listening skills is assessed, including understanding of main ideas and specific factual information; recognising opinions, attitudes and purpose of a speaker; and following the development of an argument

Marking: Each correct answer receives 1 mark Scores out of 40 are converted to the IELTS 9-band scale Scores are reported in whole and half bands

Speaking

Timing: 11-14 minutes

Tasks: The Speaking test is a 3-part face-to-face oral interview with an examiner The Speaking test is recorded

Test Parts: There are 3 parts

Part 1 Introduction and interview (4-5 minutes) The examiner introduces him/herself and asks the candidate to introduce him/herself and confirm his/her identity. The examiner asks the candidate general questions on familiar topics, e.g. home, family, work, studies and interests

Part 2 Individual long turn (3-4 minutes) The examiner gives the candidate a task card which asks the candidate to talk about a particular topic and which includes points which the candidate can cover in their talk. The candidate is given 1 minute to prepare their talk, and is given a pencil and paper to make notes. The candidate talks for 1-2 minutes on the topic. The examiner then asks the candidate one or two questions on the same topic

Part 3 Two-way discussion (4-5 minutes) The examiner asks further questions which are connected to the topic of Part 2. These questions give the candidate an opportunity to discuss more abstract issues and ideas

Skills assessed: A wide range of speaking skills is assessed, including the ability to communicate opinions and information on everyday topics and common experiences and situations by answering a range of questions; the ability to speak at length on a given topic using appropriate language and organising ideas coherently; and the ability to express and justify opinions and to analyse, discuss and speculate about issues

Marking: Candidates are assessed on their performance throughout the test by certified IELTS examiners according to the four criteria of the IELTS Speaking Test Band Descriptors (fluency and coherence, lexical resource, grammatical range and accuracy, pronunciation).

Reading

Timing: 60 minutes (no extra transfer time)

Questions: There are 40 questions

A variety of question types is used, chosen from the following: multiple choice, identifying information (True/False/Not Given), identifying writer’s views/claims (Yes/No/Not Given), matching information, matching headings, matching features, matching sentence endings, sentence completion, summary completion, note completion, table completion, flowchart completion, diagram label completion, short-answer questions

Test Parts: There are 3 sections The total text length is 2,150-2,750 words Academic Reading

Each section contains one long text. Texts are authentic and are taken from books, journals, magazines and newspapers. They have been written for a non-specialist audience and are on academic topics of general interest. Texts are appropriate to, and accessible to, candidates entering undergraduate or postgraduate courses or seeking professional registration. Texts range from the descriptive and factual to the discursive and analytical. Texts may contain non-verbal materials such as diagrams, graphs or illustrations. If texts contain technical terms, then a simple glossary is provided

General Training Reading
Section 1 contains two or three short factual texts, one of which may be composite (consisting of 6-8 short texts related by topic, e.g. hotel advertisements). Topics are relevant to everyday life in an English-speaking country

Section 2 contains two short factual texts focusing on work-related issues (e.g. applying for jobs, company policies, pay and conditions, workplace facilities, staff development and training)

Section 3 contains one longer, more complex text on a topic of general interest

Texts are authentic and are taken from notices, advertisements, company handbooks, official documents, books, magazines and newspapers

Skills assessed: A wide range of reading skills is assessed, including reading for gist, reading for main ideas, reading for detail; understanding inferences and implied meaning; recognizing a writer’s opinions, attitudes and purpose; and following the development of an argument

Writing

Timing: 60 minutes

Tasks: There are 2 tasks

Candidates are required to write at least words for Task 1 and at least 250 words for Task 2

Test Parts: There are 2 parts

                  1. Academic Writing

                  2. General Training Writing

 

1. Academic Writing

In Task 1, candidates are presented with a graph, table, chart or diagram and are asked to describe, summarise or explain the information in their own words. They may be asked to describe and explain data, describe the stages of a process, how something works or describe an object or event

In Task 2, candidates are asked to write an essay in response to a point of view, argument or problem The issues raised are of general interest to, suitable for and easily understood by candidates entering undergraduate or postgraduate studies or seeking professional registration Responses to Task 1 and Task 2 should be written in a formal style

2. General Training Writing

In Task 1, candidates are presented with a situation and are asked to write a letter requesting information or explaining the situation. The letter may be personal, semi-formal or formal in style

In Task 2, candidates are asked to write an essay in response to a point of view, argument or problem. The essay can be slightly more personal in style than the Academic Writing Task 2 essay Topics are of general interest

Timing: 11-14 minutes

Tasks: The Speaking test is a 3-part face-to-face oral interview with an examiner

The Speaking test is recorded

Test Parts: There are 3 parts

Part 1 Introduction and interview (4-5 minutes) The examiner introduces him/herself and asks the candidate to introduce him/herself and confirm his/her identity. The examiner asks the candidate general questions on familiar topics, e.g. home, family, work, studies and interests

Part 2 Individual long turn (3-4 minutes) The examiner gives the candidate a task card which asks the candidate to talk about a particular topic and which includes points which the candidate can cover in their talk. The candidate is given 1 minute to prepare their talk, and is given a pencil and paper to make notes. The candidate talks for 1-2 minutes on the topic. The examiner then asks the candidate one or two questions on the same topic

Part 3 Two-way discussion (4-5 minutes) The examiner asks further questions which are connected to the topic of Part 2. These questions give the candidate an opportunity to discuss more abstract issues and ideas

Skills assessed: A wide range of speaking skills is assessed, including the ability to communicate opinions and information on everyday topics and common experiences and situations by answering a range of questions; the ability to speak at length on a given topic using appropriate language and organising ideas coherently; and the ability to express and justify opinions and to analyse, discuss and speculate about issues

Marking: Candidates are assessed on their performance throughout the test by certified IELTS examiners according to the four criteria of the IELTS Speaking Test Band Descriptors (fluency and coherence, lexical resource, grammatical range and accuracy, pronunciation).

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